425.749.7421

Aconcagua • Guided ascent

Normal Route • Polish Traverse

Details

Length:

20 days in Argentina

Climbing Season:

Winter

Climbing Grade:

Cost

$5200 - $8500

Climbing Grade: Advanced

This climb requires a high level of climbing proficiency on steep, exposed and technical terrain above 8000 meters. Class 5.6 rock climbing is required. Excellent physical conditioning is requisite for this expedition. Climbers must provide climbing resume including high altitude experience.

Climbing Grade: Advanced Intermediate

This climb requires a high level of climbing proficiency on steep, exposed and technical terrain at high altitude. Class 4 ice or 5.8 rock climbing is required. Excellent physical conditioning is requisite for this expedition. Climbers must provide climbing resume including high altitude experience.

Climbing Grade: Intermediate

This climb requires snow and ice climbing skills with proficiency on steep and icy terrain. Strong backpacking and excellent physical conditioning is requisite for this expedition. Prior climbing experience is required. High altitude experience is beneficial.

Climbing Grade: Advanced Beginner

Prior climbing experience is beneficial. Basic snow and ice climbing skills are introduced during the program. Above average physical conditioning is requisite for this climb. No high altitude experience is required.

Climbing Grade: Beginner

No prior climbing experience is required. Strong hiking skills and good physical conditioning are requisite.

Trekking Grade: Easy

No experience required.

Trekking Grade: Moderate

This trek requires 4-6 hours of hiking per day with a small pack. Elevation gains of 1000-2000 feet per day. Strong hiking skills and good physical conditioning are requisite.

Trekking Grade: Strenuous

This trek requires 6-8 hours of hiking per day with a small pack. Elevation gains of 2000-3000 feet per day. Strong hiking skills and great physical conditioning are requisite.

If you have further questions about our climbing or trekking grades; or about your qualifications for a particular expedition, trek, climb or course, please contact us.

We offer small group climbs (max. 6 climbers) with a 3:1 climber to guide ratio and also recommend porter service depending on your expedition experience. We will decide our route based on the interest and skill level of the group. We provide a full service expedition at BC and on the mountain.

Expedition Overview

Seven Summits - Mountain GurusThis majestic climb of Aconcagua “the highest mountain in the world outside the Himalaya“ offers a truly exciting climb. Aconcagua is known by locals as the “Stone Sentinel“ and is a beautiful mountain sculpted by glaciers. It is also one of the world’s seven summits. South America’s highest mountain is a high altitude climb of moderate difficulty, requiring minimal technical skills but excellent physical conditioning. Strong backpacking skills and a high proficiency on steep and icy terrain is requisite for this expedition. High altitude experience is beneficial.

Aconcagua Expedition • Upper Guanacos Traverse (False Polish) • 20 days

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Our Aconcagua climb begins in the vibrant city of Mendoza, known for its rich Argentine culture and open air street cafes. After making our way to the small resort town of Penitentes, we spend the next three days approaching the mountain via the lush and scenic high desert of the Vacas and Relinchos Valleys aka (Ameghino Valley). Once at base camp, known as Plaza Argentina (13,800ft) our ascent follows a logical acclimatization schedule of equipment carries and rest days. During the climb we negotiate a field of ice pinnacles known as penitents and establish camp one at 16,000 feet. From Ameghino Col we have the option of traversing the upper Guanacos route to White Rocks or climb higher to traditional camp two under the Polish Glacier. Either option joins the Normal Route as our team seeks to establish a series of three high camps on the upper flanks of the mountain. Summit day begins early and climbs the Northwest ridge until we arrive at the ruins of the Independencia Hut. The climb continues past Windy Col and traverses Aconcagua’s west face to the base of the Canaleta. Steadily we make our final steps before reaching the top, traversing the narrow Guanaco ridge to the higher North Summit at 22,840ft. A large metal cross marks the highest mountain in South America. In the foreground stands the lower South Summit and directly below lies the famous nine thousand foot south face of Aconcagua. After reaching the summit our expedition traverses the mountain and descends via the Horcones Valley.

Normal Route • 20 days

The Normal Route although non-technical is physically demanding. The ascent requires basic mountaineering skills and the ability to carry a heavy backpack or use of porter support. For most expedition members we highly recommend using porter support based on your overall experience and fitness level. The route follows the Northwest Ridge to the summit of Aconcagua. Our expedition begins in Mendoza, Argentina and travels by van to Puente del Inca the trailhead to the Horcones Valley. The approach trek follows the Horcones River to Confluencia. We spend two nights at Confluencia for acclimation with a day hike to Plaza Francia, which sits beneath the massive 10,000 foot South Face of Aconcagua. The next day we arrive in basecamp also known as Plaza de Mulas at 14,300 feet. Over the next week our expedition establishes a series of three high camps on the upper mountain. We move to Canada (Camp 1), Nido de Condores (Camp 2) and then Berlin (Camp 3) or White Rocks, our high camp. From there we make our summit push via the great traverse and the Canaleta to the North Summit at 22,840ft. This is a challenging route for novice and experienced climbers alike.

Aconcagua is an ideal choice for those with a combination of mountaineering skills and high altitude experience such as Northwest climbing, Kilimanjaro, Mount Elbrus, and or the Ecuador Volcanoes.

Normal Route Itinerary

Day 1 • Arrive in Mendoza
Day 2 • Penitentes • 9,678ft
Day 3 • Confluencia • 11,300ft
Day 4 • Confluencia • South Face • 13,287ft
Day 5 • Plaza de Mulas • 14,500ft
Day 6 • Rest Day Mulas
Day 7 • Carry to Plaza Canadá • 16,568ft
Day 8 • Rest Day
Day 9 • Camp Plaza Canadá
Day 10 • Carry to Nido de Condores • 18,241ft
Day 11 • Rest Day Canadá
Day 12 • Camp Nido de Condores
Day 13 • Rest Day Nido de Condores
Day 14 • Move to high camp Cholera/Berlin
Day 15 • Summit Day • Cerro Aconcagua • 22,841ft
Day 16 • Contingency Day
Day 17 • Contingency Day
Day 18 • Descend to Plaza de Mulas
Day 19 • Penitentes • Mendoza
Day 20 • Depart Mendoza

Itinerary

Flight Schedule: USA – Santiago (SCL) – Mendoza (MZA)

Expedition begins and ends in Mendoza, Argentina

Day 1 • Arrive Mendoza
Transfer airport to hotel. The expedition begins in the vibrant city of Mendoza, known for its rich argentine culture and open air street cafes. We take a walking tour of the Plaza Independencia and the popular Sarmiento walkway. During the afternoon we have an expedition orientation, a Leave No Trace discussion and equipment check. This will be followed by a group dinner in one of Mendoza’s popular restaurants.

Day 2 • Penitentes
After registering with Aconcagua NP and obtaining permits, we transfer in private vehicles from Mendoza to the small resort town of Penitentes. In Penitentes we organize gear and enjoy a traditional Argentine meal before heading to the mountain.

Day 3 • Vacas Valley Entry – Pampa de Lenas
The approach trek begins with a short drive from Penitentes to Aconcagua’s park entry (8,000ft). Over the next two days our approach takes us through the lush and scenic high desert of the Vacas Valley. A half day of trekking leads us to our first approach camp, Pampa de Lenas. We carry light packs as mules carry all of our heavy expedition gear.

Day 4 • Casa de Piedra
Trek to Casa de Piedra, our second approach camp. The upper Vacas is full of Guanacos which appear similar to Llama’s. With luck we enjoy watching these interesting animals. Also we may see our first glimpse of Aconcagua at the head of the Relinchos Valley.

Day 5 • Plaza Argentina • 13,800ft
After ascending the steep and narrow approach of the Relinchos Valley we’re rewarded with remarkable views of Aconcagua and the Polish Glacier. We end our approach trek at base camp known as Plaza Argentina. Here we enjoy the high quality services provided by our base camp hosts. Camp is situated on the edge of a rocky glacial moraine.

Day 6 • Rest Day
After We settle into base camp and spend the day organizing gear and acclimatizing. This is a good opportunity to get to know camp, take a shower and explore the area. The park service requires a brief medical check-up with the base camp physician.

Day 7 • Carry Camp 1 • 16,000ft
The ascent of Aconcagua follows a logical acclimatization schedule of equipment carries and alternate rest days as our group climbs to establish a series of three camps on the upper flanks of the mountain. Today we carry to camp 1 and return to base camp. On the climb we negotiate a field of unique ice pinnacles formed by the sun known as penitentes.

Day 8 • Rest Day
Rest day at base camp.

Day 9 • Camp 1
Today we move to camp 1. We leave base camp once again heading northwest up the moraine of the Relinchos Glacier. The views of the mountain get better with every step. We establish camp 1 in a rocky area protected from the wind.

Day 10 • Carry Camp 2
Today we carry to camp 2 where we cache food and gear and return to camp 1. We pass Ameghino Col (17,700ft) occasionally used as an optional camp. This point allows greater views of the other snow capped peaks to the north and east of Aconcagua. Camp 2 lies at the foot of the Polish Glacier or Guanacos Camp.

Day 11 • Rest Day
Rest day at camp one.

Day 12 • Camp 2 • 19,200ft
Move to camp 2. We establish camp, eat a hot meal and get rest.

Day 13 • Camp 3 • 20,300ft
Move to camp 3. Our route traverses under the Polish Glacier joining the Normal Route at Camp Independecia. Prepare for summit day.

Day 14 • Summit Day • Cerro Aconcagua • 22,840ft
We begin our summit day in the early hours of the morning, climbing the northwest ridge until we arrive at what remains of the Independencia Hut (21,476ft), once considered the highest refuge in the world. The climb continues past Windy Col (Portezuelo del Viento) and traverses the west face (Gran Acarreo) to the base of the Canaleta. The Canaleta renowned for being the most challenging part of the route is a narrow ravine rising nearly 900 feet to the summit. Steadily we make our final steps before reaching the top, traversing the narrow Guanaco ridge to the higher North Summit at 22,840ft. A large metal cross marks the highest mountain in South America. As our team looks across the vast mountains of the Andes, exchanging summit photos, one can’t help but feel total exhilaration from the day’s accomplishments. In the foreground stands the lower South Summit and directly below lies the famous nine thousand foot south face of Aconcagua. We descend to camp three and spend the night.

Day 15-17 • Contingency Day
One additional day is scheduled for weather or acclimatization as needed.

Day 18 • Plaza de Mulas • 13,780ft
We complete our traverse of the mountain descending the Normal Route to base camp known as Plaza de Mulas.

Day 19 • Mendoza
After a full days trek via the Horcones Valley we finally reach the park entrance known as Puente del Inca. Depending on the time of day we have two options either spend the evening in Penitentes or transport to Mendoza.

Day 20 • Depart
Transport to Mendoza for evening flights home.


Itinerary Notes:
Mountain Gurus makes every effort to uphold the scheduled itinerary, although our guides are given discretion to adapt the itinerary for reasons beyond our control or due to the particular needs of the group. Please request a detailed itinerary for a list of scheduled and non-scheduled meals.

Details

Land Cost

Price per person: $5200 (based on minimum of 3 climbers)
Price per person: $5900 (based on minimum of 2 climbers)

Price per person: $8500 (based on 2 climbers with private American guide)
Price per person: $14,000 (based on 1 climber with private American guide)

Single Supplement: $500


Deposit and Payments
$700.00 deposit includes reservation fee, due with application.
Balance due 90 days prior to departure


Services included
All scheduled land transportation in Argentina
3 nights hotel accommodations (2 in Mendoza, 1 in Penitentes)
16 nights tented accommodations
Scheduled meals in Mendoza, Penitentes and during the expedition
Professional guide
Mule service
All group equipment for the expedition (including tent, stoves, group climbing gear)


Services not included
International airfare – USA – Santiago – Mendoza
Argentina Entrance Fee/Reciprocity Fee
Aconcagua Park entrance fee ($900-$1300 depending on season)
Non-scheduled airport transfers
Non-scheduled meals
Snack food during the expedition
Porter Service ($900-$1300 based on number of carries)
Single supplement for hotels
Additional hotels, meals & transportation should the climb end early
All fees for early departure from team
Personal gear
Trip cancellation insurance
Medical and evacuation coverage
Staff gratuities

Gear List

Head and Face:
• Warm Synthetic/ Wool hat: One that covers the ears.
• Heavyweight Balaclava and Neck Gaiter
• Sun Hat or Baseball cap
• Sunglasses: Essential eye protection at altitude. Bring a high quality pair
designed for mountain use. Attachable side shields are necessary, glacier glasses.
• Ski Goggles w/ 100% UV protection
• Sunscreen: SPF 40 or more.
• Lip Balm: SPF 20 or more.
• Bandanas: Tied around neck they give good sun protection.
• Climbing Headlamp: Bring plenty of batteries.

Upper Body:
• Upper Body Layers: We recommend you have three warm layers for the upper body.
Items must be made of synthetic or pile. Make sure all layers fit comfortably
over each other and supply good insulation. A good combination is a long
underwear top, a sweater, and a pile jacket. Cotton items do not provide
adequate insulation and are completely useless when damp.
• Synthetic Fleece Jacket and/or Pullover: Medium weight
• Shirts: Two synthetic shirts are best for trekking. One cotton shirts for camp.
Two synthetic long sleeve shirts for climbing.
• Shell Jacket w/ hood: Snow and high wind can be common. GORE-TEX© or waterproof
“nylon that has been seam sealed”.
• Expedition Down Parka with insulated hood: 700+ fill down
• Wind Shirt: A nylon wind shell (not waterproof)

Handwear:
• Lightweight Synthetic gloves: One pair (capilene is recommended)
• Heavyweight Synthetic gloves: One pair (WINDSTOPPER© is recommended)
• Expedition Shell Mittens w/ wrist straps: One pair

Lower Body:
• Quick Dry Hiking Shorts: One pair. Good for hiking at lower elevations in the mountains.
• Long Underwear Bottoms: Two pair. Synthetic, no cotton
• Synthetic/Pile Insulated Pants: One pair that fit loosely and comfortable. These are
essential to be worn over the long underwear bottoms. (full side zips)
• Hard Shell Pants: Bring a good pair of rain/wind pants of GORE-TEX© or waterproof
nylon that has been “seam sealed”. (full side zips)
• Trekking/Climbing Pants: Synthetic, comfortable to climb in and provide good
warmth on cool misty days, dry fast and prevent sunburn. Schoeller© fabric is recommended.
• Gaiters: One pair of high gaiters to keep dirt and snow out of boots.
• Undergarments: Enough for the duration of the program.

Footwear:
• Double Plastic Climbing Boots w/ high altitude liners
• Lightweight Socks: Two pair of synthetic liner socks to wear under heavy socks.
• Trekking Socks: Two pair synthetic medium weight
• Heavyweight Socks: Two pair of synthetic socks to wear for warmth with climbing boots.
• Hiking Boots or Trekking Shoes: One pair medium weight hiking boots/shoes large enough
to be comfortable with one liner sock and one heavy synthetic sock.
• Sport Sandals: These are to wear in camp or river crossings.

Sleeping:
• Sleeping Bag: Mountain temperatures can get down well below zero degrees Fahrenheit
so bring a warm bag (rated to minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit).
• Sleeping Pad: One closed-cell foam pad or an inflatable THERMA-REST© pad.

Packing and Backpack:
• Backpack: One lightweight large size (6000 cubic inches) comfortable pack with some
support, adequate to carry personal gear. The pack should fit properly and have a
good waist belt. Carry gear between 40 and 65 pounds.
• Trekking Backpack: optional for trek.
• Duffle/zip Bag: One large size, transporting gear via mules.
• Duffle/zip Bag: One medium size, store non-mountain gear during the expedition.
• Travel locks, nametags, and contact information written directly on the duffels.
• Bags: (3) large plastic bags (3) large Ziploc bags (2) stuff sacks
• Passport

Climbing Gear:
• Trekking poles: adjustable and collapsible
• Ice axe w/Leash: 70cm recommended
• Crampons

Drinking:
• Water Bottle: Two, one liter wide-mouth plastic bottles. NALGENE©
• Water Treatment: We recommend you bring two bottles of “Potable Aqua” or a “Polar Pure”,
crystal iodine in a bottle, to treat drinking water.
• Water Flavoring: Lemonade, Tang, Gatoraid, etc.

Personal Health and First Aid
• Small personal first-aid kit and medications
• Plastic bowl, insulated mug, and Lexan spoon
• Personal Items

Gear: A complete clothing and equipment list specific to your program will be sent to you in the pre-departure packet upon reservation. For your safety and comfort, it is extremely important that you adhere strictly to the equipment list.

Travel

International Programs • Argentina

Program start time & location: begins and ends in Mendoza

Visa/Entry Information: A valid passport is required for American citizens to enter Argentina. American citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to 90 days for tourism. A reciprocity fee is required and paid prior to entry.

Health & Immunizations: Immunizations are not required for entry into Argentina

Flight Travel Information: USA – Santiago (SCL) – Mendoza (MZA)

International Departures: Our itineraries reflect the date and time you’ll need to arrive in country for a particular program. Mountain Gurus programs begin and end in the countries, destination city. When booking your flight you’ll need to account for travel time and crossing the international dateline if needed. It’s easiest to give your booking agent the day and time you’ll need to arrive.

Meals and Food: Please prepare lunch and snack food as this service is not included during the climbing portion of the program. (see itinerary for meal schedule) It is best for clients with special meal concerns (vegetarians, etc.) to bring additional food to help supplement breakfast and dinner meals. Guides will provide boiled water and do their best to accommodate your diet.

Gear: A complete clothing and equipment list specific to your program will be sent to you in the pre-departure packet upon reservation. For your safety and comfort it is extremely important that you adhere strictly to the equipment list.

Frequently Asked Questions

Even the most experienced climbers have questions and if this is your first time on an Expedition, Trek or Northwest Climb you’re sure to have them. We provide information about such things as travel dates, itineraries and required equipment throughout our website. However, if you can’t find the answers you seek anywhere else, we try to provide them here!

Travel & Insurance

When do I need to arrive and depart?

International Departures: Our itineraries reflect the date and time you’ll need to arrive in country for a particular program. Mountain Gurus programs begin and end in the countries, destination city. When booking your flight you’ll need to account for travel time and crossing the international dateline if needed. It’s easiest to give your booking agent the day and time you’ll need to arrive.

Domestic Departures: Regarding Northwest programs our itineraries reflect the date and time the program begins at a particular start location (North Cascades NP, Olympic NP, etc.). When flying to Washington State you’ll likely need to arrive the day before the climb begins in order to meet the group at the program start location. In regards to your departure flight, our return time to the program start location is often unpredictable. We suggest a hotel reservation for the night of the last day and plan to return home the day after the end of the program.

What if I want to arrive early or depart later than the program? Mountain Gurus can assist in arranging accommodations before or after the program. Our Operations Director can recommend things to do if you desire.

Will a Mountain Gurus agent greet me at the airport? For International programs depending on your arrival time, we coordinate ground transportation. We either greet you at the airport or arrange transportation to your hotel. In most cases the program formally begins the morning after arrival day.

Do you recommend trip cancellation insurance? Mountain Gurus highly recommends purchasing of trip cancellation and travel insurance. This comprehensive travel insurance provides coverage for trip cancellation and interruption, travel delays, loss of baggage and travel documents, baggage delays, medical expenses and emergency assistance.

Do I need any other insurance? Make sure you provide yourself adequate traveler’s medical and evacuation insurance for coverage should you have a problem during the trip.

Should I have concerns when traveling internationally? We recommend registering with the United States Department of State when traveling anywhere internationally. Registration is voluntary and is your sole responsibility. Also, the United States Department of State maintains a travel Warning/Alerts list for most countries around the world. www.travel.state.gov

Experience and Fitness

What are climbing and trekking grades? Mountain Gurus provides climbing and trekking grades to help our client choose which programs are best suited for their experience level, knowledge of climbing and overall physical conditioning. Mountain travel can be extremely challenging yet profoundly rewarding. We offer programs of various skill levels and difficulty. Regardless which program you choose we expect our clients to be physically and mentally prepared for the demands of the journey.

Can anyone participate on your MG programs? We feel that anyone in reasonably good physical fitness should be able to join us on many of our programs. Mountain Gurus guides will introduce basic trekking and climbing skills needed during the course of the program. Remember your ability to participate in the program is largely dependent upon your overall health and fitness. An expedition, trek or climb shouldn’t be taken lightly and we encourage you to prepare for it by physically conditioning yourself for the strenuous aspects of the program. We strongly advise anyone who is considering a climb with Mountain Gurus, who may have a medical condition or medical history that may affect their performance, first consult with their physician. If you have further questions or concerns please contact us and our Operations Director can discuss which program is best suited for you.

Domestic & International Programs

How can I find out about necessary visas or entry requirements for the country I am visiting? Mountain Gurus will send you all necessary visa information contained within our pre-departure package. In most case American citizens can obtain a visa upon arrival. It is your responsibility to send in all pre-required visa applications and associated fees. In addition most countries maintain websites that provide all necessary information and application forms.

How can I find about necessary immunizations for the area where I am traveling? As part of your itinerary, we’ll provide you with current recommended/required immunizations for the country where you are traveling. You can always consult the Center for Disease Control at www.cdc.gov

Can I hire an additional porter? On International programs Mountain Gurus can arrange hire of a personal porter if desired for an additional cost. Please notify MG in advance if you’re considering a personal porter.

Can additional gear or clothing be stored during the program duration? In most cases additional items can be stored at the hotel or with our ground operator.

What type of accommodations can I expect?

Hotels: During our stay in international destination cities you can expect to stay in high quality hotels. When available we opt to stay in smaller boutique style hotels that provide a friendly atmosphere and high quality experience.

Camping or Lodges: When camping we provide our clients with high quality mountaineering tents. Depending on the expedition or climb clients participate in setting up tents and help in establishing camp as well as participate in cooking. On Treks and Tours, Mountain Gurus provides our clients with a fully supported experience, your tent will be set up and waiting when you arrive in camp and you’ll be greeted with hot water and a cup of tea. Destinations like Nepal we often opt to stay in high quality lodges (also known as Tea Houses) as an alternative to camping. Due to our local knowledge we choose from the finest lodges available which provide great food and a friendly warm environment.

Do you provide single accommodations? International programs that include hotels, a single room supplement is available for an additional cost if desired. For those traveling alone who do not wish to pay an additional cost for a single room, we will pair you in a room with another same-sex team member. In the event another team member of the same sex is not available for room pairings, you will be assigned a single room. During Northwest climbs single tent accommodations are not available.

How heavy a pack do I need to carry?

On Northwest programs you will be required to carry a portion of the group gear and food, in addition to your personal gear. This should be taken into consideration when deciding what you should bring. Be prepared to carry between 40-65 lbs. depending on the length of the program and group size.

For International programs pack weight varies greatly depending on the type of program. On our fully supported Treks and Tours you will only be expected to carry a small to medium sized day pack with each trekking day’s necessary clothing and essentials. 15-30 lbs. Expeditions will be required to carry a portion of the group gear and food in addition to your personal gear. 40-65 lbs. On fully supported Expeditions we utilize high altitude climbing porters which greatly minimizes the need to carry group gear. 35-50 lbs.

Private and Custom Programs

I have a group of family/friends/colleagues and we have specific dates we would like to climb. Can you customize a program for us? All of our programs can be run on a private basis. The beauty of a private program is you climb what you want, with who you want, when you want. We’ll take care of the entire program. We are also able to provide you with a custom itinerary depending on your interests. We may require a $100 non-refundable deposit for custom program planning which will be applied towards your program cost at the time of reservation.

Equipment

Does Mountain Gurus rent equipment? We do provide limited rental gear on our Northwest programs. All rental gear is limited and needs to be reserved and paid in advance. See Northwest Climbs and Courses for details. Currently we do not rent any equipment for international programs. Also, many local climbing and outdoors stores rent gear for reasonable rates.

Where should I buy equipment? We can help you find a local climbing and outdoor shop where you can purchase the equipment you’ll need.

General

Is it customary to tip your support staff or mountain guide? On international programs where we utilize support staff (porters, cooks, kitchen staff, etc.); it is Mountain Gurus practice to take a group tip and divide it among the support staff. Tipping of Mountain Guides for a job well done is always appreciated.

How can my family get in contact with me when I’m on a on a Mountain Gurus program? After your application and deposit are accepted; you will be provided with a detailed itinerary which will include hotel and ground outfitter contact information for your program. Due to the nature of the wilderness areas we travel it is likely you will be out of contact during the duration of the program. Telephone and internet access is available in some destinations at you own expense.

What if my spouse, family or friends don’t climb; can they still join me on safari? We would be delighted to make arrangements for non-trekking family and friends to join you after the climb. We suggest you extend your safari a few days to take advantage of Tanzania’s remarkable wildlife parks and diverse landscape.

Can my son or daughter join me on the program? What’s the minimum age requirement? Possibly, we would prefer to talk with you about the program you’re interested in and see if it’s an appropriate choice for someone under the age of 18. We accept participants 16 years or older on our regularly scheduled trips, accompanied by a legal guardian.